Long day but two adoptions. That’s good, right?

SDHRS Rabbit Adoption Center “Bunnies by the Beach”

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This is the first installment of what is and will be known as our San Diego House Rabbit Society (SDHRS) Adoption Center blog. An almost-daily account of what’s happening at the Center. The good, the bad, the ugly, and things that get us excited. We’ll talk about what it’s like, day after day, caring for the rabbits and trying to keep the center solvent (rescues always need more money). What happened, where we made changes, fun things going on, and more.

We hope you enjoy it and please, feel free to give us feedback in the comments below.

Saturday, Nov 1, 2014

Phew…. 6:45 p.m. and time to make salad for the bunnies. Our salad is made in a BIG tub to have enough for the buns. Tonight’s menu? Green leaf lettuce, mixed baby lettuces, Rainbow kale, parsley and chopped collard greens. YUM!  A vegan delight!  Not for me, but for the adoption center bunnies.

Here’s our salad tub.
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Tonight this fed 56 bunnies.

Here are a couple shots of bunnies expecting their salad and enjoying it.

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Bo & Mandy waiting patiently for salad.

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Howard and his mama, enjoying their salad.

Well, it’s 8 p.m. and lights out. The night light is on and the radio is playing 98.1 “smooth” music. What music do your bunnies like?

Oh yeah – we got two adoptions!  Here are photos of today’s lucky bunnies.

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Ashlee goes home with a sweet bunny boy.

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Little Dusty finds a new family.

Good night all!

~ Judith Pierce, shelter manager

 Visit us at www.sandiegorabbits.org

 

Alternative Therapies in Rabbit Care

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Holistic or homeopathic treatments, also known as alternative therapies, can be safe options to incorporate into your rabbit’s nursing care plan, in addition to medications your veterinarian may recommend. They can also be a good alternative to harmful chemicals or medications with potential or known negative side effects.

Read more: San Diego Pets Magazine – Alternative

Your Healthy Happy Bunny

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Little Truman is a happy, active boy, available for adoption through San Diego House Rabbit Society.

Here’s a great article on rabbit care and diet from a couple years ago.

http://sandiegopetsmagazine.com/view/full_story/12473358/article-Your-Healthy–Happy-Bunny?

Adopt a Recycled Rabbit

Your New Green Companion

You’re vegetarian, you shop with your own recycled bags and work hard to keep your waste out of the landfill, so it make sense that you are leaning toward an animal companion that matches your green lifestyle.   Look no further – rabbits are one of the most planet-friendly pets around!

Rabbits Create a Very Small Carbon Paw Print

Like you, rabbits are herbivores.   They eat only plants and grasses.  They are “local” consumers, enjoying fresh hay and greens available locally.  Shop at your local farmer’s market for their daily salad and enjoy an extra bonus; ask for the “trimmings” from carrots, beets, turnips, etc. and get them for free! Hay can come from your local feed store or from the House Rabbit Society’s community hay sales program, decreasing the “food miles” required to sustain your rabbit companion.

A rabbit’s waste is composed of broken down hay fibers, which is clean and free from bacteria that are harmful to our environment or us.   This makes them cleaner, fresher smelling, and easier to care for than most other animal companion species.

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Bucket enjoying the tall grass.

Your rabbit’s litter box waste can go straight onto your compost pile, your outdoors plants (the droppings can go into your indoor plants), or into the green waste bins collected by your trash company.  If you use a rabbit-friendly paper or wood-based litter box filler that, along with bunny’s droppings and hay, makes wonderful compost material.

Love to garden?  Plant a vegetable and edible flower garden to feed you – and your rabbit – and use bunny’s litter box contents to fertilize the plants and act as mulch to protect roots and hold in moisture.  You don’t even have to compost it first; rabbit waste is nutrient rich and safe to use right from the litter box.   If you belong to a garden co-op or a gardening club, your rabbit’s litter box waste will be like “gold;” everyone will want some!

Rabbits Love Recycled

Rabbits love “green” toys.  Cardboard boxes make great hideouts and are fun to chew.  Empty tissue boxes or toilet paper tubes stuffed with hay make yummy treats.  Old magazines and phone books translate into hours of shredding fun.  Empty paper bags create fun hiding places.  No need to spend money on expensive new toys; just share your junk mail and paper-based waste with bunny!

Rabbits also love babies’ toys.  Heavy plastic chew toys and rattles are fun to fling, rattle, and chew. Toddler playhouses from Little Tykes make great bunny play areas.   Pick these up at resale shops for children.

Green Cleaning

Use non-toxic cleaning products for your rabbit.  Vinegar & water make the best cleaning solution for bunny’s washable bedding, toys, and litter box.  Not only is it completely safe, vinegar has been proven to kill bacteria.  Also keep your yard and home free from pesticides and fertilizers that can harm bunny – and you.  Instead, use Diatomaceous Earth (available at nurseries, online, and at the SDHRS Bunny Supply Store) to kill fleas, mites and other pests.

Adopt a Recycled Rabbit 

Adopt – don’t shop for your new rabbit companion.  Visit your local shelter, humane society or rabbit rescue when looking for a bunny friend.  Thousands of rabbits end up with local animal welfare agencies, in need of a good home, especially after Easter.  Don’t shop at a pet store or breeder when so many pure bred rabbits are available through rescues.  When you purchase from a breeder or pet store, you are contributing to the problem of animal overpopulation and not enough homes for every bunny born.

To learn more about adopting a “recycled” rabbit, visit www.sandiegorabbits.org.

~ Judith Pierce, San Diego House Rabbit Society

From New Mexico HRS: Digital Buns

Digital Buns
With Bill Velasquez, New Mexico House Rabbit Society

Since 2007, Bill Velasquez has been involved with rabbit rescue, and in January 2010 he helped to launch the New Mexico House Rabbit Society. Recently, Bill began producing podcasts as an alternate way to educate people about house rabbits and their care. (Check out Bill’s podcasts at http://www.rabbit.org/newmexico/podcasts.html)

Bill with Gracie in his hallway "studio" where Gracie lives with Bear bunny

“Like most people, I live a mobile life and I exclusively listen to podcasts in the car rather than the radio. It seemed only natural to bring the pages of www.rabbit.org to a mobile platform so people can learn about buns while they drive. This is how I get my news and hobby information on a daily basis.

As anyone involved in rabbit rescue knows there is a tremendous need for continuing education – for volunteers, foster homes, and adopters. Not everyone enjoys reading books, so podcasts can fill an important educational niche.”

Bill promotes his podcasts through Facebook and encourages new volunteers and adopters to tune for basic information.

Bill also plans to include interviews and information from other HRS chapters: “Send me your MP3 files and I will post them!” He would also like to include video podcasts to show, “buns and bun tune-ups.”

To see video presentations on topics such as disabled rabbit care, alternative medical therapies, dental care, bunny gardening, and game-playing with bunnies, visit San Diego HRS’s Vimeo page. The page is regularly updated with presentations from our Speaker Series.